Friday, February 6, 2015

The difficult part of being a RancHer

So, FarmHer asked us to describe why being a FarmHer or RancHer is difficult. is a great website & gal who is helping promote women in agriculture by sharing their story though amazing pictures.

I was going to say that MY perceptions of how others view me as a "girl who takes care of her husband's cows" affect me.  You see I think MY perceptions affect me more than what anyone else thinks.  As I filled my truck with diesel this week, I had my husband's wallet in my hand to pay.  A man mentioned asked me if "He's letting me drive his truck today?"  I just replied, "Nope, I'm just letting him pay for my diesel today". The gal behind the counter just laughed because she sees me hooked on to that 40 ft trailer each week.  I think his comments (and other's opinions) make me better.  They drive me to be better & do better for my cattle.  

Then, today happened.  Today being a RancHer was really difficult.  I think more difficult because I AM a female.  Today we lost a little lamb. A lamb we have had in the house for two weeks.  A lamb the kids have love on & played with.  A lamb that I have been feeding every two hours through the night.

I lost it.  I cried & cried.  I cried for the lamb, I cried for my loss, I cried & sobbed for the kids's loss.  That is when being a RancHER is the most difficult.  Because I am a female it makes the losses a little more emotional, personal.  Please don't misunderstand, my husband was sad that the lamb died.  But I do think most men tend to be a little better when handling these losses.

But, I also think these same emotional maternal qualities also make me a much better RancHer.  I get more attached.  I rely on my fEELings (like maternal instincts) more.  Meaning that sometimes to get a fEELing that I need to go check something out.  9 times out of ten, I find a calf or cow that needs a little help.  I also am the RancHer in this house who has always done the night checks.  Because I stress & worry more with heifers calving, or cows calving on very cold nights.

That caring, emotional side is a blessing and a curse as a RancHer.  Today it hurts, but it will help drive me to be a better person, mother & RancHer every day.  

~Shanen - Momma to the Mama cows (& All the creatures) at the ECC